Skip to content
 
Search events. View events.
  All Categories Submit Events
Welcome to Fordham University Calendar. Choose an option from the Category(s) drop-down box & click Submit to view the calendar for a specific school. Click on the Help button to the right for any assistance while using the Calendar.
Click for help in using calendar displays. Print the contents of the current screen.

Advanced Search (New Search)
  From:
  To:



Submit
Event Details
Notify me if this event changes.Add this event to my personal calendar.Email this event to a friend.
Go Back
Doing Well by Doing Good? A New Normative Perspective on Corporate Social Responsibility
Start Date: 2/22/2013Start Time: 8:45 AM
End Date: 2/22/2013End Time: 3:00 PM

Event Description
SPACE STILL AVAILABLE.  PLEASE REGISTER AT THE DOOR

The 20th Anniversary Fordham Environmental Law Review Symposium on
DOING WELL BY DOING GOOD? A NEW NORMATIVE PERSPECTIVE ON
CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
James B.M. McNally Amphitheatre
February 22, 2013
8:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.



The topic of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) divides the business community, in large part, according to their views on the role that corporations should play in contributing to efforts to maximize social justice around the world. This year, the Environmental Law Review will host a Symposium on Doing Well By Doing Good? A New Normative Perspective on Corporate Social Responsibility, examining how questions of environmental stewardship and CSR come together to inform business practices in private industry around the world.

REGISTRATION
8:30 a.m. - 8:47 a.m.

INTRODUCTION
8:45 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
John D. Feerick, Norris Professor of Law, Fordham University School of Law

PANEL I: ENERGY AND UTILITIES
9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Arising from the discussion of environmental justice, generally, the question remains how corporations may capitalize on Earth’s natural resources without undermining fundamental agreed-upon human rights, and the growth potential of developing and developed countries, alike. Corporations play an integral role in the process of converting the world’s natural resources to energy. Careful management of our natural resources remains a divisive political struggle, and scholars are divided on the role that corporations play in preventing pollution and reduction of waste in harnessing our energy supply, and satisfying global demand. In this panel, scholars will discuss the relationship between corporate social responsibility and initiatives that impact the future of sustainability at an international level. Suggested topics for discussion include: corporate investment in renewable energy and project finance, corporate accountability for drilling practices in hydraulic fracturing, the future of derivatives in the utilities market, the distribution of the global commons such as air and water, and to what extent energy companies have a responsibility to stakeholders in both developed and developing nations who rely upon natural resources to accelerate economic growth.

PRESENTERS:
Steven Ferrey, Professor of Law, Suffolk University Law School

David B. Spence, Associate Professor , University of Texas at Austin School of Law

Maureen Bateman, Director, Entergy Corporation


BREAK
10:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

PANEL II: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

The policy framework governing corporate social responsibility and environmental law, discussed in the first panel, begs the question of how environmental justice informs our regulatory decision-making. An analysis of international law reveals a strong emphasis on the obligation of all nations to adhere to international standards of environmental-consciousness.  The question remains whether private institutions should be held accountable for issues of environmental justice around the world, and to what extent corporations ought to be held accountable for global human rights injustices. In this panel, scholars will discuss the most pressing questions regarding the relationship between corporate social responsibility, the environment, and issues pertaining to international law and justice, such as: conflict mining, fair trade, greenwashing, fairwashing, pollution and damage to the Global Commons, and the advantages and disadvantages of investing in programs to mitigate negative externalities of business, such as community economic development.

PRESENTERS
David Monsma, Executive Director, The Aspen Institute

Randall S. Abate, Associate Professor of Law; Director, Center for International Law and Justice; Project Director, Environmental, Development & Justice Program, FAMU College of Law

Paulette L. Stenzel, Professor of Finance, Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University

Judd Sneirson, Visiting Associate Professor of Law, Maurice A. Deane School of Law, Hofstra University

LUNCH
12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.

PANEL III: DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL POLICY

1:15 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

In this panel, scholars will discuss the existing regulatory landscape governing corporate social responsibility and the impact of corporate activity on the environment, at a global scale, The legal community remains divided on the question of whether corporations should be held accountable to international bodies for activity that may interfere with the fundamental rights of people around the world to enjoy a safe and clean environment. Scholars will focus on the process of international and domestic legislative decision-making and the relationship between policy covering issues of corporate accountability and the future of environmental sustainability. Sample topics for discussion include: the outcome of Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum, Doe v. Chiquita Brands International, Nigeria Farmer v. Shell, or other similar cases addressing issues of CSR, and their impact on the scheme of international environmental law and policy governing the private sector, The UN Global Compact and issues of universal jurisdiction, issues in toxic tort law and corporate liability, whether new developments in science and technology alter our justification for current regulation and policy in the US and abroad, whether corporations should be included in the equation of global emissions trading, policy governing hazardous waste, and the role of private industry in adapting to climate change at a local or global level.

PRESENTERS
Kevin Healy, Partner, Bryan Cave LLP

Michael Mohoney, Vice President, Assitant General Counsel, Chief Environmental Counsel, Pfizer

John Martin Conley, William Rand Kenan Jr. Professor of Law, UNC School of Law


CONCLUDING REMARKS

2:45 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Reva Narula, Symposium Editor, Fordham Environmental Law Review, Fordhan University School of Law


REGISTRATION
This program is free and open to the public

CLE Credits: 4.5 Non-transitional & transitional, Professional Practice NYS CLE Credits are available for $80 ($65 for Fordham Law alumni and public interest attorneys).

SPACE STILL AVAILABLE.  PLEASE REGISTER AT THE DOOR

Fordham has a financial hardship policy for this course.

To pay by check, please make check payable to Fordham Law School and mail to:

Fordham Law School
The Office of Public Programming
c/o David Quiles
140 West 62nd Street
New York, NY 10023
Location Information:
Lincoln Center Campus - Fordham University School of Law  (View Map)
140 West 62nd St
New York, NY 10023
New York
Room: James B.M. McNally Amphitheatre
Other Details:
CLE available

Calendar software powered by Active Data   
Select item(s) to Search
Select item(s) to Search
Select item(s) to Search
Select item(s) to Search